Rodeo community mourning loss of a true friend in Terry Marshall

By DARRELL NESBITT

Like a cowboy riding off into the sunset on a movie screen, the memories – oh so golden – of a man deeply enriched by the lifestyle of ranching, rodeo and riding with his family at home and on the road, will be forever etched in the minds of countless friends.
“The outpouring of sympathy has been amazing,” said daughter Lacey, as she spoke of the death of her father Terry Marshall of Rapid City. “He definitely touched thousands of lives. It’s really kept us going, knowing how many people cared about him as much as we did.”
At the age of 64, Terry died at home, and while a definitive cause has yet to be determined, it appears to be a result of a heart attack.
Rodeo nurtures the close family ties that make life rich! And for that he was blessed to be able to rodeo with his three daughters – Kelly-Jo of Melville, SK, Lacey of Strathclair and Jerri-Lynn of Brandon.
Through various rodeo associations including the Heartland Rodeo Association (HRA), formed in 1995, to give families an avenue to compete and bond within the province, a ranch family from a small prairie town became fully involved. Through involvement they lived the…
Cowboy’s Prayer - Heavenly Father, we pause, mindful of the many blessings, You have bestowed upon us. We ask that You be with us at this rodeo and we pray that You will guide us in the arena of life, We don’t ask for special favours. We don’t ask to draw around a chute fightin’ horse or to never break a barrier. Nor do we ask for all daylight runs or not to draw a steer that won’t lay; Help us Lord, to live our lives in such a manner that when we make that last inevitable ride to the country up there, where the grass grows lush, green and stirrup high, and the water runs cool, clear and deep, that You as our last judge, will tell us that our entry fees are paid.

AWARDS TELL STORIES
It can be said that belt buckles are the trophies of the rodeo world and they tell their own stories.
For many of us including myself, Terry is remembered from a pickup man’s standpoint. One of the best on the circuit, he didn’t back down from many circumstances and was well known for his prowess of removing ornery or stubborn bulls out of the arena.
Stock contractors from Manitoba (Top Line, Seven Cross Ranch), Saskatchewan (Prime Time Rodeos, Prairie Rodeo) and Alberta (Whiteline Rodeo) also knew his worth.
At the HRA’s 2014 Finals hosted by the community of Carman, Terry was honoured with the ‘Cowboy of the Year’ award. Very appreciative but yet humble, Terry also was blessed to win a number of other awards including his pride and joy - a trophy saddle presented by the Manitoba Rodeo Cowboys Association (MRCA) in 1979.
He was the MRCA Finals Champion in team roping in 1986, the MRCA 1994 Pick-up Man of the Year, HRA Finals Champion Header in 1996, and was gunning for the HRA Finals Champion Heeler honour, when his life was cut far too short.
“He was extremely proud to win the team penning buckle, alongside Karen Krueger, at Agribition in Regina in 2000,” stated Lacey. “They were the only Manitobans to ever win the buckle.”
With rodeo being a part of Terry, it was only fitting his wisdom and knowledge was passed down to three extremely talented cowgirls cheered on by his second wife Kathy. Granddaughter Emma-Dee Marshall, Kelly-Jo’s little girl, was a gem in a proud grandfather’s eyes.

RODEO IS LIFE
Lacey said that one thing as sisters they promised each other was not to quit rodeo - a foundation built on family and friends!
“My dad built his farm by himself, and built it into what it is, and we promised we’re not going to let it go.”
Her older sister Kelly-Jo stands behind that decision. “I am very proud to say Terry Marshall was not only my dad, but also raised me when his first marriage went south. While I basically grew up riding on a seat of a truck, I learned a lot from the man I so dearly loved.”
Perhaps some felt Terry had a gruff and rough side to him, which may have stemmed from his playing days with the Brandon Wheat Kings, and in the rugged and now-defunct Eastern Hockey League with the Syracuse Blazers, upon being drafted by the St. Louis Blues. His hockey days down in the United States also presented the opportunity to appear as a hockey playing extra in the original Slap Shot movie, alongside Paul Newman. Others saw him as a kind-hearted soul, who cherished sharing jokes with acquaintances, away from the world of work, rodeo or horse-drawn sleigh and wagon rides at community events.
His quips were many… “You look like an old lady throwing a dish towel into a sink,” was one of many expressed to Lacey while practicing team roping at the Cathcart farm near Neepawa. He always reminded his daughters to get their britches moving - as rodeo was not a social event - however, from their perspective it was just that.
His life also focused around livestock inspecting, PFRA pasture riding, and his M2 Ranch hayrides that shared old-fashioned values with youth.

LIKE A COWBOY
With rodeo being a cornerstone of Terry’s life, when Rapid City held its first rodeo in 1997, it was dedicated to Terry’s son Dane, who died as a result of a tragic farming accident at the age of three in 1990. “The impact of our father’s death is evident,” Lacey said. “Like a cowboy we will share stories, fond memories and cherish the awards, and life’s pleasures of a man, strong on talent, and dedicated to the wonderful sport of rodeo.”
Friends, family and colleagues will come together to celebrate the life of Terry Marshall on Saturday, Jan. 24, 2:00 p.m. at the Victoria Inn, Brandon. Pure poetry in motion easily describes the movement of pick-up men working a rodeo. Flat out saving a cowboy’s life in a split second, it was not to be to save the precious life of a man, whose source of happiness included his horse “Tardy”, warm sunshine, and the sweet smell of a bronc’s uneasiness.
A legend known as Terry Marshall will forever live on, as his winning cowboy smile sums up the miles of love, passion, and dedication to not only the sport, but perhaps more heartwarming, to his family. When a loved one becomes a memory, that memory becomes a treasure!



The Heartland Rodeo Association was created in 1995 to promote and continue the sport of rodeo in Manitoba, with the entire family in mind. It is built open family oriented weekends, giving contestants of all ages the opportunity to compete in rodeo events. Today, it is still a strong and growing association, hosting rodeos throughout the year in various locations throughout the province. Competitors strive towards achieving the highest number of points in each of the 9 major and 2 minor events throughout the rodeo season. To end each season, the Heartland Rodeo Association holds a finals weekend, where top qualifiers compete for a chance to win awards.



Congratulations to the Richer Roughstock Rodeo - 2014 Rodeo of the year
Presented by Lacey Marshall - President of the HRA
   
Congratulations to Terry Marshall - 2014 Cowboy of the year
Bible sponsored by The Fellowship of Christian Cowboys - presented by Donna Baker
Buckle sponsored by Mid Town Ford - presented by Reg Wiebe
Congratulations to Jodi Winkler - 2014 Cowgirl of the year
Bible sponsored by The Fellowship of Christian Cowboys - presented by Terry Baker
Buckle sponsored by Kevin Kinkead Enterprises - presented by Cauy and Taylor Kinkead




CLICK HERE TO VIEW 2014 YEAR END AWARDS


CLICK HERE TO VIEW 2014 FINALS RESULTS




- Manitoba High School Rodeo Association

- 7-6 Ranch Children's Wish Foundation Fundraiser

- Manitoba Bareback/Saddlebronc Riding School
The 2015 HRA Rulebook is now available online.
CLICK HERE TO VIEW RULEBOOK





ALL MEMBERS PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING RULES:

ENTRIES/CALL BACK CONDUCT:

  1. Rude, argumentative or harassing behavior or coarse language towards ACE operator will not be tolerated.
  2. Entries and callbacks are limited to one call per member. Repeated calls during entries or callback will not be tolerated. The purpose of callback is to find out which performance you were drawn for. Calls for other than this purpose will not be tolerated.
  3. Entries and callback times are 5:00-9:00pm. Calls outside these times will not be accepted.
  4. ACE does not guarantee preferred days for entries. If you do not get drawn for the day of your choice, it is your responsibility to find an equal switch. ACE is not responsible for switching/changing the draw once it has been completed.
  5. The ACE operator’s and board of directors’ decision regarding draws are final.
  6. All incidents will be documented and forwarded to the board of directors, and may result in fines/suspensions.
MEMBERSHIPS:
Membership must be bought and processed seven days before entries open for the member wishes to enter. Memberships can be bought at the first rodeo of the season.

TURN OUT FINES:
1. A contestant who, upon calling back finds that they do not have the preferred performance asked for, may notify the ACE operator that they will be turning out.

a. At that point the contestant will be responsible for the entry fee, the ACE fee plus be subject to a $10 fine.

b. A contestant who does not notify the ACE operator that they will be turning out will be responsible for the entry fees, the ACE fees plus be subject to a $50 fine.
c. A contestant who is entered to perform in the slack may turn out without a fine, but must pay the ACE fee.

2. A contestant who, upon calling back has received the preferred performance and asked to be turned out will be responsible for the entry fees, ACE fee and be subject to a $50 fine.

3. A contestant who upon doing call back receives the performance of their choice and fails to notify the ACE operator that they will be turning out will be responsible for the entry fees, ACE fees and subject to a $100 fine.



ACE INFO
Phone: 436-3418
Email: entries@heartlandrodeoassociation.com
Email entries will be accepted day of entries from 7am-7pm.
Entries are Monday prior from 5-9pm
Callback is Wednesday prior from 5-9pm.

When entering, if there is only one day you are able to attend a rodeo, please state that day "or out (such as Sunday or out)". If you only state one day and do not clarify "or out", it is assumed that it is your preferred day, but that you can compete either day. If you do not get the day of your preference, it is your responsibility to find a switch, but you must notify entries of the switch. If you clarify "or out", and get "or out", it is your responsibility to find a switch. If you switch the contestant you are switching with is then "out" (i.e. will not compete in that event at that rodeo) and you take their spot in the performance. Entries will not be responsible for finding switches or changing the draw once it is completed. Entries does not guarantee preferred days.



Ken was presented this Award at his hometown rodeo
( Shilo Rodeo in July 2011).  Ken is being recognized for
all of his hard work and dedication to rodeo over the years. He has been a significant supporter of Heartland and the sport of rodeo in Manitoba for well over 15 years.

Ken helped to make Heartland Rodeo into what it is today.  He has served the association as a well respected competitor, judge, and sponsor. He lead the association as President and continued as a board of directors member for many years.

Ken has been a long time member and competitor. He is very proud of his horses who both were recognized as Heel Horse of the Year many times. Ken had the opportunity to rope with his son and grandsons at Shilo Rodeo this past year and he considers this one of his greatest moments in rodeo. Family and friends have always been important to Ken, and he always has a smile or joke to share in and out of the rodeo arena.

Ken Kelly has been an integral part of rodeo in Manitoba and to the Heartland Rodeo Association.

 He is the second member to be given the HRA Gold Card Award.

 The Heartland Rodeo Association would like to sincerely thank Ken for his contributions to the association.